How to Annoy Your Bed Partner

After spending most of your life sleeping alone, making a significant life change like moving in with your romantic partner can be a challenge. Although you’re excited to embark on this new journey, you may also be a bit nervous about how you two are going to get along at bedtime. Will your partner annoy you — or will you annoy them?

Turn Up the Temperature When Your Partner Likes It Lower

You love sleeping in a warm and comfortable environment surrounded by many blankets and pillows, but you also prefer to have the room temperature set at a toasty 72 degrees fahrenheit. Although the ideal room temperature falls in a range from 60 to 67 degrees fahrenheit, you feel too cold to sleep in that environment. However, your partner may need to sleep in a cooler environment. Otherwise, they make wake up in the middle of the night sweating, feeling dizzy, overheated, and annoyed.

Talk to your partner to see if you can find some middle ground. Perhaps you can sleep with a slightly lower room temperature, less blankets and pillows or warmer clothing. As for your partner, they may be able to sleep in lighter clothing and use a cooling pillow.

You Read Late at Night

Whether you read a book using a bedside lamp, or read the day’s news on your iPad, any kind of light shining in your partner’s sleeping environment can keep them awake at night. Do your partner a favor by finding a compromise. You can use small a clip-on task light for your late-night reading habits, or you can set your phone to emit a less obnoxious orange light instead of blue light.

You Snore

Imagine you and your partner go to bed. You quickly fall asleep and start to snore, however, you can still feel your your partner tossing and turning beside you. Your partner tries their hardest to get to sleep by burying their head in a pillow or turning on white noise such as a fan or an air purifier in an effort to block out your snoring, but to no avail. Your sleeping partner wakes you up to complain about your snoring, but you ignore it and go back to sleep, and start snoring once more. The next morning, you wake up feeling exhausted, and your equally exhausted sleeping partner complains about how your snoring kept them awake the night before. Does this situation sound familiar to you?

If you’re waking up in the morning feeling exhausted and your partner complains about your snoring, that could be a sign of sleep apnea. If you’re wondering what sleep apnea is and how it can be treated, take a look at one of my previous blogs, “How Do I Know If I Have Sleep Apnea?

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s